a portrait of Bruce Dayton from 1969; Bruce passed away on November 12, 2015

CEO Brian Cornell Reflects on Bruce Dayton’s Life and Legacy of Giving

More than 50 years ago, the Dayton family conceived an idea that at the time was revolutionary in retail—“to combine the best of the fashion world with the best of the discount world.” A year later, in 1962, the doors to the first Target store were opened in Roseville, Minn.
 
When I joined this storied company, many people offered ideas and advice, but at 96 years young, Bruce Dayton’s words were perhaps the most profound. He truly wanted me to succeed—he wanted Target to succeed—but not for the reasons you might think. His focus wasn't on protecting his legacy, but rather, about furthering the commitment to community he began so many years ago. That notion is one of the Dayton family’s core philosophies: Companies’ fortunes are intrinsically linked to the health and vitality of the communities in which they operate. And Bruce understood this long before almost anyone else.
 
Today, corporate social responsibility is a priority of nearly every company in America. But decades ago, when Bruce was opening Target’s first stores, he was one of the lone voices espousing this view. And he backed his words with bold actions—ensuring Target gave 5 percent of its profits back to the community. A commitment we are proud to uphold today. 
 
Bruce’s record of achievement is remarkable: building the first indoor shopping mall, pioneering the concept of discount retail, founding a company that would become one of the largest private-sector employers in the world. But as much as I am in awe of Bruce’s accomplishments, it is his legacy of generosity that I will always remember the most.
 
— Brian Cornell, Chairman and CEO, Target Corp.
 
Visit the Interactive History Timeline to learn more about how Bruce Dayton and his family helped lay the groundwork that made Target what it is today.